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November 24, 2008

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He8ther

Well, I am very late to comment on this, but for the sake of posterity...

This is just beautifully written, and the Stevie Nicks metaphor (which has me chuckling), I feel, has helped me make up my mind on this fragrance once and for all. You really hit the nail on the head that it's *the image* of femininity that Cabochard conjures up which is dated and seems very cliché today. I have never got along with Bandit, to which I too seem to be allergic, but I can withstand Cabochard and have a small vintage bottle which I have tried again and again every time I've read about how dark and sexy and wicked it is meant to be.

I am reminded now of a well-known English speaker on fragrance, who has described how he feels the chypre category is the sexiest because it's sort of all buttoned up with this, ahem, 'animal' lurking inside somewhere. To hear him talk, and he is openly homosexual, it becomes clear that he's describing some sort of feminine ideal, not a real woman. I have come to the conclusion that wearing Cabochard is like trying to be that imaginary female: corseted and smoking, unable to breathe, and appealing only to men who don't actually like women enough to care how they feel.

see wolf

"I have come to the conclusion that wearing Cabochard is like trying to be that imaginary female: corseted and smoking, unable to breathe, and appealing only to men who don't actually like women enough to care how they feel."

Gosh, I love this comment. I'm sniffing my wrist right now as I nabbed a vintage mini at the flea market today for $2.80 - yes an oddly specific sum.
I can't say I ever understand the whole likening chypre's to sexuality. To me they remind me of Autumn, leaves, medicinal drinks, Europe.
I like this, I find it interesting but it is giving me a headache. Its so sharp and aromatic. It does feel dated, the type of woman it is presenting to me is someone bolshy and outdoorsy, who wears a lot of tweed and breeds hunting dogs.
If it wasn't so sharp it might be a bit more wearable.

theUntrainedNose

You write beautifully.

I completely disagree with you (I believe both green chypre and leather can be done in a feminine way, in an unisex way and in a masculine way, and these notes happen to mix with my skin chemistry in a feminine and dark, sensual way), but you write so, so well, and in a manner so reasoned, so intelligent, that I will subscribe your blog.

Did you ever try the present formulation of Cabochard? How did you find it?

I have never worn either, though I've worn indie perfumes with green chypre and leather notes in a pleasing way. It could happen that the indie formulations I tried are more feminine.

Perfumaniac


Hi untrained nose, it is hard to believe, but I wrote this 6 years ago just as I was beginning to think about perfume seriously. I dont really agree with what I said either! I love Bandit and Cabochard, and only think about femininity and masculinity in perfume now mostly to argue against the idea of gendered fragrances. I have not smelled the reformulated Cabochard. Bandit is not bad, but definitely not as rich as the vintage. I suspect the same is with Cabochard. Thanks for the comment!

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