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December 19, 2010

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angie Cox

Oh there you perfume bloggers go again , now I want this !! Maybe it's called this because the "nose" wasn't sure it would work and so tried it out on the public ? I am guessing they loved it and I think I will too , now where is that list for 2011?

Anne

I want it too. You make it sound divine. Fortunately it is summer where I live, so Theorema can wait a bit. Thanks for the great review. Why was Theorema discontinued I wonder? It gets lots of love, but I assume mainly from perfumistas rather than regular buyers. Oh well. We don't don't all need to be wearing Lola and Chloe.

Mary

Love this review, Barbara! I fell in love with Theorema years ago, and it has a permanent place in my heart. I think it's just as well that it was discontinued, as I fear it would have been tweaked into ruination like so many others. Theorema's sillage is quite short-lived (on me anyway), but it's very cozy and comforting and I love how subtle the rose is.

brian

I have no idea whether there's any relation but when thinking of Fendi Theorema I've always thought of the Pasolini film from 1968 called Teorema. The story basically had to do with upper class sexual mores and the potential there for corruptibility, if memory serves. Terence Stamp played a stranger who comes into the life of an Italian family, bringing in a lot of sexual decadence with him. He seduces everyone--maid to patriarch--then leaves as abruptly as he appeared.

Anna in Edinburgh

Following up brian's very useful lead above, Wikipedia provides a helpful film synopsis *AND* etymology of the title.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Teorema_(film)#Etymology_of_film.27s_title_and_its_structure

'Its Greek root is theorema (θεώρημα), meaning simultaneously "spectacle," "intuition," and "theorem."'

Whether this helps one to appreciate the fragrance is another matter! (I can't resist trying to answer questions and solve puzzles:-)

cheerio, Anna in Edinburgh

Perfumaniac

Oh, I saw that a long time ago, Brian! Good call. (Terence Stamp is so beautiful in it, and he's still gorgeous.) Maybe Theorema is a corruption of the classic oriental, with guaiac wood as the Terence Stamp figure? Or what note would serve as the disruptor in the structure?

Perfumaniac

Hi Anna, thanks for the etymological sleuthing! Theorem is an interesting word, and so odd to name a perfume. (How do spectacle, intuition, structure, and a proposition deducible from basic postulates add up?!) Maybe theorem gives the perfume a kind of solidity and a sense of the eternal, which is ironic given that it was then discontinued!

Perfumaniac

Angie and Anne: Theorema minis are reasonably priced on eBay. I highly recommend you give this one a try! Just even sniffing the cardboard box it came in gives me a peppery, guaiac-y thrill!

Mary: I'm glad you liked the review! I really fell in love with Theorema, and now realize I need to pay attention when I hear a chorus of perfumistas proclaim their love for something I haven't tried. Its main personality doesn't last long on me, either, but that milky, spice rose skin scent stays close to me for hours. This one's full bottle-worthy. I'm going to have to save my pennies.

angie Cox

A very happy and smelly 2011 and Happy holidays . Thank-you for all the wonderful reviews. angie

Perfumaniac

Happy holidays and a smelly 2011 to you, too, Angie! Thanks for your comments and insights! :)

Mals86

I was prepared to love Theorema, and did really enjoy the first couple of hours of it, but that chocolate note (I see you noticed it too) just Did Me In. Urgh. I tried it several times, and then when I found myself dreading the drydown, I traded away my mini.

Lovely, enlightening post, by the way.

Perfumaniac

Thanks, Mals! I just love how peppery and kinda dirty Theorema is, and the chocolate note doesn't bother me much when it's cloaked in so much stinkiness!

JulienFromDijon

I still don't have smelled Theorema, normally a friend is receiving a bottle of it for me in Germany (Theorema bottles occurs more often there, who know why?).
Somehow, your description reminds me of "noir epice" from Malle, that I'm wearing now, because of the clove cinnamon nugmeg pepper accord, and orange rose theme.

In a shop, I smelled rosewood extract oil. For me it smelled exactly like a rose should be. Interesting how different are personal opinions about what a rose smells. (I like bulgarian rose extract oil too (I like it even more), but I'm doomed to became anosmic after 2s, like a thirst very fast quenched)
Linalol? Maybe I'm mistaken, but in opposite to the spicy rosy quality of rosewood, I ranked linalol as the "linen" smell of many lavender masculine, beginning from Jicky or "eau de Guerlain". A cold stream, clear blue as the sky, and very long-living odor, between dry lavender and anisic whatever.

Perfumaniac

Hi again, Julien. I've smelled Noir Epice, but I cant' recall it. Theorema has a very smoky, funky quality to it that I don't think NE has. It reminds me a lot of Le Feu d'Issey in that regard, but it's even smokier. I'm curious, are you a perfumer or perfume student?

JulienFromDijon

Me a professional ? I take it for a compliment.
I'm just an amateur saying amaterish not reliable things, though I keep dreaming of doing one day Isipca, or getting any parfumeur diplom.
I don't know "le feu d'issey", I saw the name on a friend bottle list, maybe I should ask for a decant if it's discontinued.

Perfumaniac

Well, Julien, you speak with authority. :) You should try Le Feu d'Issey. It's amazing...

Diane Caney

This perfume IS DIVINE. I have two bottles left but am deep despair that I can no longer buy it. Let's blitz FENDI with requests to re-release it!!

Meg (olenska)

To add to the etymological, here's something entomological: Theorema is also a genus of butterfly. :)

Perfumaniac

Thank you, Meg! I found them on Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Theorema Theyre beautiful! I remember reading that butterflies have a vanilla-like scent on their wings to attract mates. This could be the answer were looking for...

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